Logical Fallacies

Logical Fallacies

Relativism

This is the belief that truth is “relative“. That it varies from person to person. Relativism includes the idea that there are no absolutes. But the proposition that “there are no absolutes” is itself an absolute proposition. Relativists assert that it is absolutely true that truth is not absolute. This is a self-defeating philosophy. If relativism were absolutely true,...

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Rational thinking

If evolution were true, there wouldn’t be any rational reason to believe it! If life is the result of evolution, then it means that an evolutionist’s brain is simply the outworking of millions of years of random-chance processes. The brain would simply be a collection of chemical reactions that have been preserved because they had some sort of survival values in the past. If...

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Reductio ad absurdum

“reducing to absurdity“. In this type of consistency a principle taken to its logical conclusion will yield an absurd result. Evolutionists will want to take a philosophy only so far, and then inconsistently switch to another. For example, using this principle (Reductio ad absurdum), you can refute empiricism. By this standard to it’s logical conclusion, we would eventually...

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Naturalism

The believe that nature is all that there is. All life is the result of the laws of nature acting over time. In some cases, scientists prefer methodological naturalism rather than metaphysical naturalism. Methodological Naturalism is the belief that science should be conducted as if nature were all that there is, regardless of whether or not it is actually true. Metaphysical Naturalism is the...

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Empiricism

The belief that ALL knowledge is acquired by unbiased observation of the evidence around us. In other words, observation is the ULTIMATE standard by which ALL truth claims are tested. This in itself is a worldview! Many evolutionists are empiricist. We must eventually ask the empiricist HOW he/she KNOWS that “all knowledge is gained through observation”. Clearly this is not something...

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Begging the Question

This is a subcategory of the Fallacies of Presumptions and it’s also known as “Circular Reasoning” or Tautology –This is when the conclusion of an argument is incorporated into one of its premises (or when the truth of a premise depends upon the conclusion). Example 1: “How do I know evolution is true? Because it is a fact!“. This argument is asserting (A) that evolution is true on the basis of...

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